Can social work afford to remain apolitical in the age of neoliberalism and managerialism discourse at the expense of social justice, challenging inequalities and empowerment of its recipients: dilemmas and considerations for north and south global worlds?

Lewis, E. (2015) Can social work afford to remain apolitical in the age of neoliberalism and managerialism discourse at the expense of social justice, challenging inequalities and empowerment of its recipients: dilemmas and considerations for north and south global worlds? In: Joint Social Work and Social Development Conference, 4-7th October 2015, Port Elizabeth, South Africa. (Unpublished)

[img]
Preview
PDF (Conference paper)
SA Conference paper11Edith Lewis.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (10MB) | Preview

Abstract

Historically social work has advocated the principles and values of human rights, social justice, tackling inequalities while empowering individuals and communities by liberating them to enhance their well-being, while enabling interactions with economic, political and social environments. (IASSW, 2001, 2014).

This Paper will argue:
• How the adoption of neoliberalism discourse has thwarted and sucked social work into its unsympathetic discourse at the detriment of social work recipients who continue to live in relative and absolute poverty.
• And consider how social work in both global worlds can engage effectively in radical social justice and mobilise itself as a powerful profession which challenges the status quo (Mullay, 2007, Ritzer, 2008 cited in Brady et al, 2014, p 37) while making its principles and values a reality for its recipients.
• The need to challenge welfare systems of the global north that encourages dependency and demonise recipients without significantly changing people’s social and economic circumstances.
• The need for social work to challenge the complacency in poverty eradication and meaningful practices by global south states while recognising the needs of both urban and rural recipients post-colonial era.
• Importance of social work to encourage and mobilise its recipients to challenge the unjust systems and practices globally that reinforces inequalities.
• The need to consider the impact of the deprofessionalisation of social work and the importance of the profession to remobilise itself as a meaningful agent of social change and offer meaningful critical social work globally. (Stepney, 2006)

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
H Social Sciences
J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Wellbeing > School of Public Health, Midwifery and Social Work
Depositing User: Mrs Edith Lewis
Date Deposited: 09 Oct 2018 09:07
Last Modified: 09 Oct 2018 09:07
URI: https://create.canterbury.ac.uk/id/eprint/17694

Actions (login required)

Update Item (CReaTE staff only) Update Item (CReaTE staff only)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics

Share

Connect with us

Last edited: 29/06/2016 12:23:00