A 4-week resistance training intervention improves stability, strength and neuromuscular activity in the lower limb: a case study of a cerebral palsy adult

McManus, A., Bembridge, M., Scales, J., Wiles, J.D, Coleman, D. A. and O'Driscoll, J. (2018) A 4-week resistance training intervention improves stability, strength and neuromuscular activity in the lower limb: a case study of a cerebral palsy adult. International Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, 2 (2). 050-055.

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Abstract

Spastic diplegia, a form of cerebral palsy, is a neurological disorder that results in some degree of spasticity. It is often associated with impairment of both normal and selective movement of the lower limbs, and some degree of muscular weakness. Resistance training is an established exercise intervention with numerous neurological benefits.

Evidence suggests that resistance training can positively improve stability in young populations with cerebral palsy. However, little research exists in adult populations, who are at greater risk of inactivity due to ageing and an increase in sedentarism. A single-subject (aged 35-years old, 150.5 centimetres, 81 kilograms) case-study was therefore carried out to investigate the effectiveness of a 4-week resistance training intervention on stability, neuromuscular activity and force output in a male adult with cerebral palsy. The variables measured were total centre of pressure displacement, peak torque in both the quadriceps and hamstrings and Surface Electromyography (sEMG) activity in the Rectus Femoris (RF), Vastus Lateralis (VL), Biceps Femoris (BF) and Semitendinosus (ST). The results demonstrated that a 4-week resistance training intervention reduced total centre of pressure displacement (-51.34%) whilst concomitantly increased sEMG output (RF left +80% right +22%, VL left +160% right +26%, BF left +203% right +44%, ST left +40% right +90%) and peak torque values (right leg extension -7%, right leg flexion +29%, left leg extension +11%, left leg flexion +42%).

In conclusion, this case study demonstrates that a 4-week resistance training intervention improves the stability of the participant, possibly through neurological adaptations and improvements to lower limb strength.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cerebral palsy; motor unit recruitment; neural adaptations; spastic diplegia
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology
Divisions: Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences > School of Human and Life Sciences
Depositing User: Dr Jamie O'Driscoll
Date Deposited: 11 Sep 2018 09:25
Last Modified: 11 Sep 2018 14:45
URI: https://create.canterbury.ac.uk/id/eprint/17584

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Last edited: 29/06/2016 12:23:00