Precognitive priming of compound remote associates: using an implicit creative insight task to elicit precognition

Vernon, D. (2018) Precognitive priming of compound remote associates: using an implicit creative insight task to elicit precognition. In: 61st Annual Convention of the Parapsychological Association, 2nd-5th August, 2018, Petaluma, California, USA. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Precognition encapsulates the notion that something that occurs in the future can influence cognition and/or behaviour now. However, a number of recent research projects examining this aspect of parapsychology have failed to produce consistent results. Nevertheless, some light may be shed on these disparate findings by a recent meta-analysis which suggests that what may be considered fast/implicit type tasks are more able to elicit such effects as compared to slower/explicit type tasks. Given this, and the proposed link between an individual’s creativity and their ability to exhibit psi type behaviours, the current study attempted to elicit a precognitive effect using a creative insight task. The task involved presenting participants with three words and requiring them to come up with a fourth related word. This ‘compound remote associates’ task is a standard test for creative insight. Here, the added twist was that participants were primed with the correct answer to half the items after they had completed the task. The prediction was that participants would be more accurate when completing the compound remote associates for which they were later primed compared to those not primed. Unfortunately, the results showed no evidence of a precognitive priming effect. The lack of such an effect, could parsimoniously be interpreted as suggesting that precognition is impossible. However, there remain many positive effects reported in the literature. Hence, a plausible alternative explanation is offered that suggests the context (lab based vs. on-line) of the research may influence the outcome.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF1001 Parapsychology > BF1002 Psychic research. Psychology of the unconscious
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF1001 Parapsychology > BF1161 Telepathy. Mind reading. Thought transference
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF0309 Consciousness. Cognition
Divisions: Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences > School of Psychology, Politics and Sociology
Depositing User: Dr David Vernon
Date Deposited: 22 Aug 2018 08:37
Last Modified: 23 Aug 2018 15:26
URI: https://create.canterbury.ac.uk/id/eprint/17548

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Last edited: 29/06/2016 12:23:00