'You were all the world like a beach to me' the use of second person address to create multiple worlds in literary video games: 'Dear Esther', a case study

Colthup, H. (2017) 'You were all the world like a beach to me' the use of second person address to create multiple worlds in literary video games: 'Dear Esther', a case study. International Journal of Transmedia Literacy. ISSN 2465-2261. (In Press)

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Abstract

This paper focuses on the problematic overlapping uses of 'you' within the video game Dear Esther (The Chinese Room, 2012) and how this gives rise to an uneasy and personalised experience rather than a fixed canonical reading. Dear Esther is a Walking Simulator and this type of video game is concerned with telling a story and not the conventional binary win or lose outcome of many other video games. The simple game mechanics reliant upon the player moving around a simulated space in order to learn the story means that a literary analysis is better suited to understanding the transmedia story worlds. Literary fiction uses multiple varieties of second person address to create story worlds, Walking Simulators encourage players to actively identify themselves not with but as the main story protagonist, and the use of second person address largely drives this identification.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Dear Esther (game); video games; storyworld; gameworld; second person address
Subjects: P Language and Literature
Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA0075 Electronic computers. Computer science
Divisions: Faculty of Arts and Humanities > School of Humanities
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Ms Heidi Colthup
Date Deposited: 23 Mar 2018 09:56
Last Modified: 28 Jun 2018 14:05
URI: https://create.canterbury.ac.uk/id/eprint/17129

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Last edited: 29/06/2016 12:23:00