Oryzomys couesi en el sureste de México: estimaciones genéticas y filogeográficas

Vázquez-Domínguez, E., Mejía-Puente, A. and Vega, R. (2009) Oryzomys couesi en el sureste de México: estimaciones genéticas y filogeográficas. In: Cervantes, F., Vargas-Cuenca, J. and Hortelano-Moncada, Y., eds. 60 años de la Colección Nacional de Mamíferos del Instituto de Biología, UNAM. Aportaciones al conocimiento y conservación de los mamíferos mexicanos. Mexico: Instituto de Biología, UNAM. pp. 205-219

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Abstract

Oryzomys couesi, known as rice rat, has an ample distribution in México, however, the information about this rodent is rather limited. In this study we analyzed the genetic diversity and differentiation of O. couesi populations in Southern México (Yucatán, Campeche, Quintana Roo and Chiapas states) with microsatellite loci and cytochrome b sequences. We also evaluated the genetic variability, divergence and phylogeographic structuring of a subgroup of samples (Campeche, Chiapas and Cozumel). High genetic diversity was found, in terms of polymorphism (100%), number of alleles (11.2), haplotypic diversity (0.939) and observed (0.578) and expected (0.779) heterozygosity levels. Populations showed high genetic flow, with low genetic differentiation values, with exception of the population of Quintana Roo, which was significantly differentiated from Chiapas and Yucatán. Differentiation results were the same when, instead of using political divisions, populations were grouped based on vegetation type and geographic location of samples. Phylogeographically, results evidenced that the population from Cozumel originated by migration from the Yucatán península, through several continent-island colonization events. Despite the fact that O. couesi in the study region has high genetic diversity levels, they are not as high as values found in other murid rodents. The moderate, but significant differentiation found between populations, particularly for Quintana Roo and Chiapas, is an indicative of the progressive isolation that populations are being subject to; likewise, population densities of the species have diminished significantly, altogether giving an exceptional conservation value to O. couesi, at least in Southern México.

Item Type: Book Section
Subjects: Q Science
Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QH Natural history
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0001 General including nature conservation, geographical distribution
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0301 Biology (General)
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0301 Biology (General) > QH0359 Evolution
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0301 Biology (General) > QH0426 Genetics
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0301 Biology (General) > QH0540 Ecology
Q Science > QL Zoology
Q Science > QL Zoology > QL0001 General
Q Science > QL Zoology > QL0605 Chordates. Vertebrates
Q Science > QL Zoology > QL0605 Chordates. Vertebrates > QL0700 Mammals
Divisions: Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences > School of Human and Life Sciences
Depositing User: Dr Rodrigo Vega
Date Deposited: 27 Apr 2017 14:06
Last Modified: 27 Apr 2017 14:06
URI: https://create.canterbury.ac.uk/id/eprint/15802

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Last edited: 29/06/2016 12:23:00