Population genomics applications for conservation: the case of the tropical dry forest dweller Peromyscus melanophrys

Vega, R., Vázquez-Domínguez, E., White, T., Valenzuela-Galván, D. and Searle, J. (2016) Population genomics applications for conservation: the case of the tropical dry forest dweller Peromyscus melanophrys. Conservation Genetics. ISSN 1566-0621.

[img] PDF
COGE-D-15-00294 Vega et al ConsGenet Manuscript FINAL3.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 4 November 2017.

Download (671kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

Recent advances in genomic sequencing have opened new horizons in the study of population genetics and evolution in non-model organisms. However, very few population genomic studies have been performed on wild mammals to understand how the landscape affects the genetic structure of populations, useful information for the conservation of biodiversity. Here, we applied a genomic approach to evaluate the relationship between habitat features and genetic patterns at spatial and temporal scales in an endangered ecosystem, the Tropical Dry Forest (TDF). We studied populations of the Plateau deer mouse Peromyscus melanophrys to analyse its genomic diversity and structure in a TDF protected area in the Huautla Mountain Range (HMR), Mexico based on 8,209 SNPs obtained through Genotyping-by-Sequencing. At a spatial scale, we found a significant signature of isolation-by-distance, few significant differences in genetic diversity indices among study sites, and no significant differences between habitats with different levels of human perturbation. At a temporal scale, while genetic diversity levels fluctuated significantly over time, neither seasonality nor disturbance levels had a significant effect. Also, outlier analysis revealed loci potentially under selection. Our results suggest that the population genetics of P. melanophrys may be little impacted by anthropogenic disturbances, or by natural spatial and temporal habitat heterogeneity in our study area. The genome-wide approach adopted here provides data of value for conservation planning, and a baseline to be used as a reference for future studies on the effects of habitat fragmentation and seasonality in the HMR and in TDF.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10592-016-0907-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
Subjects: Q Science
Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QH Natural history
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0001 General including nature conservation, geographical distribution
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0301 Biology (General)
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0301 Biology (General) > QH0359 Evolution
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0301 Biology (General) > QH0540 Ecology
Q Science > QL Zoology
Q Science > QL Zoology > QL0605 Chordates. Vertebrates
Q Science > QL Zoology > QL0605 Chordates. Vertebrates > QL0700 Mammals
Divisions: Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences > School of Human and Life Sciences
Depositing User: Dr Rodrigo Vega
Date Deposited: 09 Nov 2016 16:42
Last Modified: 04 Dec 2016 04:27
URI: https://create.canterbury.ac.uk/id/eprint/15108

Actions (login required)

Update Item (CReaTE staff only) Update Item (CReaTE staff only)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics

Share

Connect with us

Last edited: 29/06/2016 12:23:00