The shifting landscape of prime ministerial accountability to parliament: an analysis of Liaison Committee scrutiny sessions

Bennister, M., Kelso, A. and Larkin, P. (2016) The shifting landscape of prime ministerial accountability to parliament: an analysis of Liaison Committee scrutiny sessions. The British Journal Of Politics And International Relations, 18 (3). pp. 740-754. ISSN 1467-856X.

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Abstract

Prime ministerial power is always contingent, based on the utilisation of personal and institutional resources, subject to various formal and informal constraints. Parliament is both a political resource to be utilised, but also a veto-player. In the absence of formal mechanisms setting out the requirements for UK prime ministerial accountability to parliament, a fluid and essentially personalised relationship has developed. Regular prime ministerial appearances before the House of Commons Liaison Committee, begun in 2002, have added to parliament’s scrutiny toolkit. This article considers the accountability of the prime minister to parliament by analysing the emergence and development of the Liaison Committee evidence sessions, and draws on interviews with participants and examination of the session transcripts, in order to assess the value of this scrutiny mechanism within the broader framework of prime ministerial-legislative relations

Item Type: Article
Subjects: J Political Science > JF Political institutions (General)
Divisions: Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences > School of Psychology, Politics and Sociology
Depositing User: Dr Mark Bennister
Date Deposited: 11 Oct 2016 13:45
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2017 12:01
URI: https://create.canterbury.ac.uk/id/eprint/14932

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Last edited: 29/06/2016 12:23:00