Identifying risks for male street gang affiliation: a systematic review and narrative synthesis

Raby, Carlotta and Jones, F. W. (2016) Identifying risks for male street gang affiliation: a systematic review and narrative synthesis. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology. ISSN 1478-9949.

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Abstract

Gang violence has increased in recent years. Individuals are becoming gang affiliated younger, and many have suffered historic maltreatment. Subsequent exposure to violence can result in profound consequences, including acute psychological harm. This review aims to identify predictive risk factors for male street gang affiliation. A systematic literature search was conducted utilising PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Social Policy and Practice databases (from the databases’ inception to 03/04/15). From this search, n=244 peer-reviewed papers were included in an initial scoping review, and n=102 thereafter met criteria for a systematic review; a narrative synthesis follows. Gang members have typically faced numerous historic adversities across multiple domains; individual, family, peers, school and community. Cumulative factors generated an independent risk. The meta-narrative described an overarching failure to safeguard vulnerable individuals, with the motivation for gang affiliation hypothetically arising from an attempt to have their basic needs met. Clinical and research recommendations were made to inform early intervention policy and practice.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0435 Psychiatry > RC0467 Clinical psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences > School of Psychology, Politics and Sociology > Salomons Centre for Applied Psychology
Depositing User: Dr Fergal W. Jones
Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2016 14:42
Last Modified: 23 Aug 2017 17:48
URI: https://create.canterbury.ac.uk/id/eprint/14738

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Last edited: 29/06/2016 12:23:00