Exploring precall using arousing images and utilising a memory recall practice task on-line

Vernon, D. (2016) Exploring precall using arousing images and utilising a memory recall practice task on-line. In: 40th Society for Psychical Research International Annual Conference., 2nd-4th September, 2016, Leeds, UK.

[img]
Preview
PDF
Vernon, D. (2016). Exploring precall using arousing images. SPR Conference, Leeds. Sept 2-4. .pdf

Download (487kB) | Preview

Abstract

There is on-going discussion over claims that future practice can retroactively influence prior performance. An initial attempt to examine possible precall effects using a modified priming task showed no evidence of precognition when looking at the response times, but did find that participants were more accurate to respond to material they would see again in the future (Vernon, 2015). This may indicate that a memory task relying primarily on accuracy of performance, such as a memory recall task, could be a more sensitive measure of precognition. Whilst previous attempts at this have produced mixed results (see, Galak et al., 2012; Ritchie et al., 2012) it may be possible to bolster potential precall effects by utilising arousing images (see, Maier et al., 2014; Lobach, 2009) within a paradigm that requires participants to remember and recall the stimuli during the post-recall practice phases to help facilitate possible precall effects. Finally, by running the study on-line it will be possible to eliminate any potential influence the experimenter could have over participants taking part. Hence, the aim of this study will be to use an on-line paradigm to present a selection of arousing images that participants then have to recall. Following the recall phase they will then be presented with a random sub-set of images to view and recall four times. The research question is simply: ‘will post-recall practice lead to greater recall of those items compared to items not practiced’.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Uncontrolled Keywords: precognition
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF1001 Parapsychology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF1001 Parapsychology > BF1002 Psychic research. Psychology of the unconscious
Divisions: Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences > School of Psychology, Politics and Sociology
Depositing User: Dr David Vernon
Date Deposited: 15 Jul 2016 12:51
Last Modified: 15 Jul 2016 12:51
URI: https://create.canterbury.ac.uk/id/eprint/14718

Actions (login required)

Update Item (CReaTE staff only) Update Item (CReaTE staff only)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics

Share

Connect with us

Last edited: 29/06/2016 12:23:00