Predictors of IAPT psychological well-being practitioners’ intention to use CBT self-help materials routinely in their clinical practice

Levy, M. A., Holttum, S., Dooley, J. and Ononaiye, M. (2016) Predictors of IAPT psychological well-being practitioners’ intention to use CBT self-help materials routinely in their clinical practice. The Cognitive Behaviour Therapist, 9 (11). ISSN 1754-470X.

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Abstract

Despite efficacy and effectiveness evidence, and recommendations from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), use of CBT self-help materials remains inconsistent in UK mental health services. Since 2006, the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme has provided standardized training and mandates routine use of CBT self-help materials by their trainee psychological well-being practitioners (PWPs). This study tested whether the main constructs of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB; attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioural control), past use, prior training and demographic characteristics, would predict PWPs’ intention to use self-help materials routinely in their clinical practice. Stage 1 utilized a standardized procedure to create measures for the constructs of TPB, before the design and testing of a web-based, cross-sectional questionnaire. In stage 2, the questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of trainee PWPs (n = 94). Data was analysed using multiple linear regression, mediation analyses, and content analysis. TPB constructs predicted intention to use self-help materials, with only direct attitude contributing significantly to 70% of the variance in intention. Past use of materials predicted intention, via direct and indirect mediation. Qualitative data from 43 trainees highlighted clients’ experience of self-help materials as positive, albeit with some practical constraints. The results suggest that the main constructs of TPB have some utility in predicting trainee PWPs’ intention to use self-help materials routinely. Future prospective, longitudinal research could investigate actual use of self-help materials to elucidate cognitive factors involved in trainees’ clinical decision-making post-qualification.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General) > R0690 Medicine as a profession. Physicians > R0697 Allied health professionals
Divisions: Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences > School of Psychology, Politics and Sociology > Salomons Centre for Applied Psychology
Depositing User: Dr Sue Holttum
Date Deposited: 28 Jun 2016 14:19
Last Modified: 03 Jun 2017 10:14
URI: https://create.canterbury.ac.uk/id/eprint/14646

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Last edited: 29/06/2016 12:23:00