Youth offending teams: a grounded theory of the barriers and facilitators to young people's help seeking from mental health services

Lane, Carla (2015) Youth offending teams: a grounded theory of the barriers and facilitators to young people's help seeking from mental health services. D.Clin.Psych. thesis, Canterbury Christ Church University.

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Abstract

Young people within the youth justice system experience three times higher rates of mental health problems than the general youth population yet are one of the least likely groups to seek help. Very little theory or research is available within this population to explain these high rates of unmet need.
This study aimed to develop a theory about the barriers and facilitators that Youth Offending Team workers experience when supporting young people to access mental health services.
Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants; eight youth offending team workers, two young people and a mental health worker. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim before being analysed using “grounded theory”. This method was chosen to allow the in depth exploration of participants experiences and the development of theory within an under researched area.
The results showed that Youth Offending Team workers appeared to play a crucial role in supporting a young person’s help seeking from mental health services. A preliminary model was developed which demonstrated the complex relationships between six identified factors which influenced this role.
The study concluded that Youth Offending Team workers would benefit from more support, training and recognition of the key role they play in supporting young people to become ready for a referral to mental health services. Mental health services could be well placed to provide this. Clinical implications are discussed. Further research is needed to develop our understanding of what influenced the help seeking of this vulnerable population.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA1001 Forensic Medicine. Medical jurisprudence. Legal medicine > RA1148 Forensic psychology
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine > RA0790 Mental health services. Mental illness prevention
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ0499 Mental disorders. Child psychiatry > RJ0503 Adolescent psychiatry
Divisions: Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences > School of Psychology, Politics and Sociology > Salomons Centre for Applied Psychology
Depositing User: Mrs Kathy Chaney
Date Deposited: 16 Oct 2015 15:30
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2017 06:37
URI: https://create.canterbury.ac.uk/id/eprint/13902

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Last edited: 29/06/2016 12:23:00