The effects of training mental health practitioners in medication management to address nonadherence: a systematic review of clinician-related outcomes

Bressington, D., Coren, E. and MacInnes, D. L. (2013) The effects of training mental health practitioners in medication management to address nonadherence: a systematic review of clinician-related outcomes. Nursing: Research and Reviews, 3. pp. 87-98. ISSN 2230-522X.

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Abstract

Background: Nonadherence with medicine prescribed for mental health is a common problem that results in poor clinical outcomes for service users. Studies that provide medication management-related training for the mental health workforce have demonstrated that improvements in the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of staff can help to address nonadherence. This systematic review aims to establish the effectiveness of these training interventions in terms of clinician-related outcomes.
Methods: Five electronic databases were systematically searched: PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, PsycInfo, and Google Scholar. Studies were included if they were qualitative or quantitative in nature and were primarily designed to provide mental health clinicians with knowledge and interventions in order to improve service users’ experiences of taking psychotropic medications, and therefore potentially address nonadherence issues.
Results: A total of five quantitative studies were included in the review. All studies reported improvements in clinicians’ knowledge, attitudes, and skills immediately following training. The largest effect sizes related to improvements in clinicians’ knowledge and attitudes towards nonadherence. Training interventions of longer duration resulted in the greatest knowledge- and skills-related effect sizes.
Conclusion: The findings of this review indicate that training interventions are likely to improve clinician-related outcomes; however, due to the methodological limitations of the current evidence base, future research in this area should aim to conduct robust randomized controlled trials with follow-up and consider collecting qualitative data to explore clinicians’ experiences of using the approaches in clinical practice.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > RT Nursing
Divisions: pre Nov-2014 > Faculty of Health and Social Care > Health, Wellbeing and the Family
Depositing User: Mr Daniel Bressington
Date Deposited: 28 May 2013 14:54
Last Modified: 23 Jan 2016 09:47
URI: https://create.canterbury.ac.uk/id/eprint/11961

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Last edited: 29/06/2016 12:23:00