The effect of short-term dietary manipulation on gross efficiency during cycling

Cole, M., Coleman, D. A. and Wiles, J. (2011) The effect of short-term dietary manipulation on gross efficiency during cycling. In: 16th Annual Congress of the European College of Sports Science, 6th-9th July, 2011, Liverpool John Moores University.

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Abstract

To assess the effect of short term dietary manipulation on gross efficiency, 14 trained male cyclists (V̇O2max 56.6 ± 7.2ml.kg-1.min-1, mean ± SD) completed three 2-hour tests at a steady-state submaximal exercise intensity (60% of Power at V̇O2max). In the 3-days preceding each test, participants consumed a diet (~4000kcal.day-1) that was either high in carbohydrate (High CHO, [70% carbohydrate, 20% fat, 10% protein]), low in carbohydrate (Low CHO, [70% fat, 20% carbohydrate, 10% protein]) or contained a moderate amount of carbohydrate (Mod CHO, [45% carbohydrate, 45% fat, 10% protein) in a randomised, crossover designed study. Gross efficiency (GE) along with blood lactate and glucose were assessed at regular intervals (~30mins) and heart rate was measured continuously at 5 second intervals throughout the test. Mean GE was significantly greater following the High CHO diet than the Mod CHO diet. (High CHO=20.1% ± 0.5%, Mod CHO=19.3 ± 0.6%, mean ± SD; P<0.05). More specifically, GE was significantly greater after 25mins, 85mins and 115mins of the test (P<0.05). Dietary manipulation had no effect on blood glucose, blood lactate or heart rate responses during exercise (P>0.05). In conclusion, significant differences in gross efficiency were obtained following alteration of participants’ diet in the 3-days preceding assessment. This suggests that before the measurement of gross efficiency takes place, participants’ diet should be carefully controlled and monitored to ensure the validity of the results obtained.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV0558 Sports science
Divisions: pre Nov-2014 > Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences > Sport Science, Tourism and Leisure
Depositing User: Dr Damian Coleman
Date Deposited: 20 Jun 2012 18:52
Last Modified: 11 Dec 2014 14:10
URI: https://create.canterbury.ac.uk/id/eprint/10817

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Last edited: 29/06/2016 12:23:00